ENAMEL EROSION CAN NOW BE SEEN IN OVER 45% OF YOUR TEEN PATIENTS2

Dietary factors, especially consumption of acidic drinks, have been found to be the main etiological factor of dental erosion.1 The greater the amount of erosive products consumed per day, and the more often they are consumed, the greater the risk of Erosive Tooth Wear (ETW).3

 

WHY ENAMEL EROSION IS A GROWING CONCERN

  • In a recent study, 56% of teenagers 18-19 years old were found to have ETW2
  • 45.9% of children aged 13-19 years had evidence of ETW in at least one tooth4
  • Prolonged contact between extrinsic or intrinsic acids with tooth surfaces will result in softening and dissolution of surface minerals5
  • Effective prevention of dental erosion includes measures that can avoid or reduce direct contact with acids and increase acid resistance of dental hard tissues5

Statistically significant correlations were found between the prevalence of erosion and beverage food intake:

  • Soft drinks
  • Carbonated beverages
  • Alcohol drinks – including wine and beer
  • Fresh fruits, pickles, ketchup
  • Sour candies
  • Vitamin C tablets
  • Coffee, tea
  • Vegetarian diet
  • Raw food diet

 

DENTAL EROSION IS IRREVERSIBLE AND MUST BE PREVENTED8

STANNOUS FLUORIDE HELPS PROTECT AGAINST EROSION – CONSENSUS REPORT3

A new Consensus Report of the European Federation of Conservative Dentistry recognizes protective benefits of Stannous Fluoride Dentifrice against erosive tooth wear and that products [toothpastes] containing stannous fluoride have the potential for slowing the progression of erosive tooth wear.


THE CRITICAL pH OF ENAMEL IS 5.5 – ANY DRINK OR FOOD WITH A LOWER pH MAY CAUSE EROSION9

CREST® PRO-HEALTH™ CONTAINS STANNOUS FLUORIDE TO HELP PREVENT ENAMEL EROSION8

Stannous fluoride protects tooth enamel at low pHs to help prevent acid erosion

Stannous adsorbs onto the tooth surface forming a micro-thin shield which lowers the reactivity of the enamel surface towards dissolution by extrinsic and intrinsic acids

Surface adsorbed stannous does not interfere with fluoride’s role in helping to repair weakened enamel inside and out

STABILIZED STANNOUS FLUORIDE HELPS PREVENT ENAMEL EROSION IN THE ENAMEL-SOFTENING ZONE8

AN INCREASINGLY ACIDIC DIET CAN EXPOSE YOUR TEEN PATIENT’S MOUTH TO A LOW pH ENVIRONMENT FOR LONGER PERIODS OF TIME


For more resources to help maintain your teen patient’s oral health:

https://www.dentalcare.ca/en-ca

 

References:

  1. Hasselkvista A et al. A 4 year prospective longitudinal study of progression of dental erosion associated to lifestyle in 13–14 year-old Swedish adolescents. Journal of Dentistry 2016;47: 55–62.
  2. Okunseri C et al. Erosive tooth wear and consumption of beverages among children in the United States. Caries Res 2011;45(2):130-5. Available at: doi: 10.1159/000324109
  3. Cavalho TS et al. Consensus report of the European Federation of Conservative Dentistry: erosive tooth wear–diagnosis and management. Clin Oral Investig 2015:19(7);1557-61. Available at: doi: 10.1007/s00784-015-1511-7
  4. McGuire J et al. Erosive tooth wear among children in the United States: relationship to race/ethnicity and obesity. Int J Paediatr Dent 2009;19(2):91-8. Available at: doi: 10.1111/j.1365- 263X.2008.00952
  5. Yan-Fang R. Dental Erosion: Etiology, Diagnosis and Prevention. RHD Magazine 2011(8):76-80. Available at: http://rdhmag.com/etc/medialib/new-lib/rdh/site-images/volume-31/issue- 8/1108RDH075-085.pdf
  6. Al-Dlaigan YH et al. Dental erosion in a group of British 14-year-old school children. Part II: Influence of dietary intake. Br Dent J 2001;190(5):258-61.
  7. Poonam Jain P et al. A comparison of sports and energy drinks – Physiochemical properties and enamel dissolution. General Dentistry 2012 (May/June):190-197.
  8. Data on file at P&G Canada.
  9. Moynihan P, Petersen PE. Diet, nutrition and the prevention of dental diseases. WHO Collaborating Centre for Nutrition and Oral Health, School of Dental Sciences, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, U. Public Health Nutrition 2004; 7(1A), 201–226. Available at: DOI: 10.1079/PHN2003589